A combination of cherry juice and cold water immersion does not enhance marathon recovery compared to either treatment in isolation: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

Difranco, Isabella, Cockburn, Emma, Dimitriou, Lygeri ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5093-558X, Paice, Katherine ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5128-7118, Sinclair, Scott, Faki, Tanwir, Hills, Frank ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8235-7545, Gondek, Marcela B., Wood, Alyssa and Wilson, Laura J. ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3744-6132 (2022) A combination of cherry juice and cold water immersion does not enhance marathon recovery compared to either treatment in isolation: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 4 , 957950. pp. 1-11. ISSN 2624-9367 [Article] (doi:10.3389/fspor.2022.957950)

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Abstract

Purpose: Cherry juice (CJ) and cold water immersion (CWI) are both effective recovery strategies following strenuous endurance exercise. However, athletes routinely combine recovery interventions and less is known about the impact of a combined CJ and CWI protocol. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of combining CWI and CJ (a “cocktail” (CT)) on inflammation and muscle damage following a marathon.
Methods: A total 39 endurance trained males were randomly assigned to a placebo (PL), CWI, CJ, or CT group before completing a trail marathon run. Muscle damage (creatine kinase (CK)), muscle function (maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC)), and inflammation (interleukin-6 (IL-6); C-reactive protein (CRP)) were measured at baseline, immediately after marathon (only IL-6), 24 h, and 48 h after marathon.
Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups and no group × time interaction effects for any of the dependent variables. Confidence intervals (CI) illustrated that CT had unclear effects on inflammation (IL-6; CRP) and MVIC, but may have increased CK to a greater extent than PL and CJ conditions.
Conclusion: There is no evidence of an additive effect of CJ and CWI when the treatments are used in conjunction with each other. On the contrary, combining CJ and CWI may result in slightly increased circulating CK.

Item Type: Article
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Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute > Physiology at the London Sport Institute
Item ID: 35684
Notes on copyright: COPYRIGHT
© 2022 Difranco, Cockburn, Dimitriou, Paice, Sinclair, Faki, Hills, Gondek, Wood and Wilson.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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Depositing User: Laura Wilson
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2022 09:27
Last Modified: 05 Sep 2022 15:11
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/35684

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