Phytoremediation using native plants

Futughe, Anthony, Purchase, Diane ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8071-4385 and Jones, Huw ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0024-864X (2020) Phytoremediation using native plants. In: Phytoremediation. Concepts and Strategies in Plant Sciences. Shmaefsky, Brian R., ed. Springer Nature, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 285-327. ISBN 9783030000981, e-ISBN 9783030000998. [Book Section] (Published online first) (doi:10.1007/978-3-030-00099-8_9)

Abstract

The unprecedented growth in industrialization has significantly increased pollution in the environment causing public health concerns. The remediation of various contaminated environmental matrices presents a global challenge. Phytoremediation using native plants can serve a dual purpose of site remediation and ecological restoration. Native plants provide an ideal residence for microbial community in their rhizosphere with enzymatic ability to accumulate, stabilize, biodegrade or volatilize various inorganic and organic contaminants. A case study that compared a native plant, Chromolaena odorata, from crude oil-polluted land in Nigeria against a referenced plant, Medicago sativa, for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remediation is presented in this chapter. It was observed that the native plant thrived, tolerated and degraded PAHs better than the reference plant but with no significant difference in PAH degradation. The use of plants is well suited to its natural contaminated area and solar-driven, prevents erosion and eliminates secondary airborne and waterborne waste but with some challenges. Phytoremediation using native species may be effective and efficient than its non-native counterparts, and it is ecologically safer, cheaper, aesthetically pleasing, socially acceptable and easier to cultivate. Native plants in phytoremediation can be further enhanced and improved using molecular techniques to optimize the harvest time, reduce growth duration and increase biomass production and root depth.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: Part of the Concepts and Strategies in Plant Sciences book series (CSPS)
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Natural Sciences
Item ID: 34186
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Huw Jones
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2021 11:52
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2021 11:52
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/34186

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