Understanding patient health-seeking behaviour to optimise the uptake of cataract surgery in rural Kenya, Zambia and Uganda: findings from a multisite qualitative study

Bechange, Stevens ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1125-9993, Jolley, Emma, Tobi, Patrick ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0341-3770, Mailu, Eunice, Sentongo, Juliet, Chulu, Titamenji, Abony, Maurice, Chege, Moses, Mulenga, Glenda, Ngorok, Johnson, Adera, Tesfaye and Schmidt, Elena (2021) Understanding patient health-seeking behaviour to optimise the uptake of cataract surgery in rural Kenya, Zambia and Uganda: findings from a multisite qualitative study. International Health . ISSN 1876-3413 [Article] (Published online first) (doi:10.1093/inthealth/ihab061)

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Abstract

Background
Cataract is a major cause of visual impairment globally, affecting 15.2 million people who are blind, and another 78.8 million who have moderate or severe visual impairment. This study was designed to explore factors that influence the uptake of surgery offered to patients with operable cataract in a free-of-charge, community-based eye health programme.
Methods Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with patients and healthcare providers in rural Zambia, Kenya and Uganda during 2018–2019. We identified participants using purposive sampling. Thematic analysis was conducted using a combination of an inductive and deductive team-based approach.
Results
Participants consisted of 131 healthcare providers and 294 patients. Two-thirds of patients had been operated on for cataract. Two major themes emerged: (1) surgery enablers, including a desire to regain control of their lives, the positive testimonies of others, family support, as well as free surgery, medication and food; and (2) barriers to surgery, including cultural and social factors, as well as the inadequacies of the healthcare delivery system.
Conclusions
Cultural, social and health system realities impact decisions made by patients about cataract surgery uptake. This study highlights the importance of demand segmentation and improving the quality of services, based on patients’ expectations and needs, as strategies for increasing cataract surgery uptake.

Item Type: Article
Keywords (uncontrolled): Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health, General Medicine, Health(social science)
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Natural Sciences
Item ID: 33949
Notes on copyright: © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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Depositing User: Jisc Publications Router
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2021 11:14
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2021 09:31
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/33949

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