Expansive learning: online nurse education that is co-produced, creative and critical

Lambert, Nicky ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8785-4719, Pezzella, Alfonso ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2000-5760, Vargas, Antonio, Willimott, Jade and Gleeson, Helen ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0505-5281 (2021) Expansive learning: online nurse education that is co-produced, creative and critical. In: RCN Education Forum National Conference & Exhibition 2021. Stepping up: educating the nursing workforce in challenging times, 20-21 Apr 2021, London (Online). . [Conference or Workshop Item]

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Abstract

Introduction to Expansive Learning This session sets the context for Expansive Learning - a blended-learning module which can be experienced solely online if a student chooses to. We support students to develop applied skills through active enquiry & reflection on their personal and professional identities. It is designed to address the needs of our particular students. Three quarters of our B.Sc. Nursing course students are local. We are a diverse group (66% BAME) almost half are mature students and we seek to add value as many students come to study via atypical routes.

The context for nurse education is increasingly complex - all students are faced with academic stressors, which can be further compounded by factors including separation from their support networks and post-graduation job insecurity. Learners paying for their education have increased financial worries and high expectations of their academic achievement. Widening participation has rightly allowed access to many non-traditional students but it has also led to an increase in people with additional learning needs many of whom are underserved. The number of students context for nurse education is increasingly complex - all students are faced with academic stressors, which can be further compounded by factors including separation from their support networks and post-graduation job insecurity. Learners paying for their education have increased financial worries and high expectations of their academic achievement. Widening participation has rightly allowed access to many non-traditional students but it has also led to an increase in people with additional learning needs many of whom are underserved. The number of students experiencing mental health problems has increased significantly and levels of suicide in university settings continues to rise. Students studying to become nurses have added expectations in that they must also develop professional behaviours and navigate emotionally demanding workplaces. To meet these needs we co-created innovative learning experiences, ensuring dynamic and inclusive learning environments. We worked with service users, students, practitioners, carers and members of the public including artists, musicians, and staff from museums & galleries to offer choice, flexibility, volunteering opportunities, and reflective learning.

Learning objective
To establish the context of this innovative curriculum development
Supporting critical thinking and cultural competence
Nurses must be self-aware, critical thinkers in order to exercise professional judgement. They also need to demonstrate compassion and cultural competence. Appreciating creativity can be nurturing on a personal level and provides opportunities for student nurses to develop applied skills through active enquiry and reflection. In this session we will share our research findings in this area and offer practice guidance.

The module includes input from museums and galleries (British Museum, V&A, and the National Gallery) and colleagues with a range of creative backgrounds. This is a deliberate strategy to draw on art and culture as resources to support student nurses to develop resilience and professional sense of self in order to participate in a profession recognised as challenging (McKie, 2012). One way students are supported is by encouragement to recognise and regulate their emotions, one way we do this is by teaching the skills of ‘slow looking’. Art is not a panacea, but appreciating creativity can be nurturing on a personal level and provides opportunities for student nurses to develop applied skills through active enquiry and reflection (Frei et. al, 2010). Being able to work positively with diversity is a necessary skill in society and art and culture are used to support student nurses to explore the human condition outside of the biomedical model and develop the knowledge and skills which enable them to flourish as active citizens (Moorman et.al, 2017). To that end we led voluntary field trips to a range of exhibitions and galleries, we opened these up via Eventbrite to our local community and on one occasion a group ranging from 3 months to 72yrs visited Kara Walker’s Fons Americanus where we had a free discussion that covered racism to the guidance around tackling modern slavery.

Learning objectives 1. To articulate best practice in supporting student learning around diversity and cultural competence 2. To highlight ways to successfully co-produce and evaluate educational experiences that draw on arts and culture The student perspective In this session we will report back on our experience of leading an independent student review of the module as year one students and submitting a report with recommendations for improvements. We will state how we did this, what our learning was and outline our findings and suggestions We are both in practice at the moment and collaborating on a written piece is challenging so instead here's our video abstract: https://youtu.be/127exH2lhi8 Learning objectives • To share our experience of leading an independent student review of the module as year one students • To outline our findings and suggestions for improvements Social media and online engagement Social media and online working is part of health and whilst students in the past were advised to avoid a digital footprint, we actively equipped them to work within this field. We collaborated with @WeNurses to deliver an online experience for all students and this session outlines our research findings and offers suggestions to ensure best practice. The students generally adapted well to the online experience - enjoying its flexibility and the choice it offers. The Social Media component however was the most controversial area of the module with the students who were IT literate very positive and those who found it a challenge, equally vocal in their dislike of it. However it generated some extremely positive learning and the challenge will be how to take that forward whilst reducing the anxiety it provoked for some.

Learning outcomes
• To explore the findings from three surveys into using social media – in particular Twitter to enhance student learning
• To highlight some of the issues that can impact digital literacy and offer some thoughts on best practice in this area.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Research Areas: A. > School of Health and Education > Mental Health, Social Work and Interprofessional Learning
Item ID: 32998
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Alfonso Pezzella
Date Deposited: 23 Apr 2021 08:32
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2021 13:02
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/32998

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