Global occurrence, chemical properties, and ecological impacts of e-wastes (IUPAC technical report)

Purchase, Diane ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8071-4385, Abbasi, Golnoush, Bisschop, Lieselot, Chatterjee, Debashish, Ekberg, Christian, Ermolin, Mikhail, Fedotov, Petr, Garelick, Hemda ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4568-2300, Isimekhai, Khadijah, Kandile, Nadia G., Lundstrom, Mari, Matharu, Avtar, Miller, Bradley W., Pineda, Antonio, Popoola, Oluseun E., Retegan, Teodora, Ruedel, Heniz, Serpe, Angela, Shevah, Yehuda, Surati, Kiran R., Walsh, Fiona, Wilson, Benjamin P. and Wong, Ming Hung (2020) Global occurrence, chemical properties, and ecological impacts of e-wastes (IUPAC technical report). Pure and Applied Chemistry, 92 (11) . pp. 1733-1767. ISSN 0033-4545 [Article] (doi:10.1515/pac-2019-0502)

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Abstract

The waste stream of obsolete electronic equipment grows exponentially, creating a worldwide pollution and resource problem. Electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) comprises a heterogeneous mix of glass, plastics (including flame retardants and other additives), metals (including rare earth elements) and metalloids. The e-waste issue is complex and multi-faceted. In examining the different aspects of e-waste, informal recycling in developing countries has been identified as a primary concern due to widespread illegal shipments, weak environmental as well as health and safety regulations, lack of technology and inadequate waste treatment structure. For example, Nigeria, Ghana, India, Pakistan and China have all been identified as hotspots for the disposal of e-waste. This article presents a critical examination on the chemical nature of e-waste and the resulting environmental impacts on, for example, microbial biodiversity, flora and fauna in e-waste recycling sites around the world. It highlights the different types of risk assessment approaches required when evaluating the ecological impact of e-waste. Additionally, it presents examples of chemistry playing a role in potential solutions. The information presented here will be informative to relevant stakeholders to devise integrated management strategies to tackle this global environmental concern.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Natural Sciences
Item ID: 29578
Notes on copyright: © 2020 IUPAC & De Gruyter. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. For more information, please visit: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
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Depositing User: Diane Purchase
Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2020 09:43
Last Modified: 22 Nov 2020 17:33
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/29578

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