Change of direction deficit in national team rugby union players: is there an Influence of playing position?

Freitas, Tomás T., Alcaraz, Pedro E., Bishop, Chris ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1505-1287, Calleja-González, Julio, Arruda, Ademir F. S., Guerriero, Aristide, Reis, Valter P., Pereira, Lucas A. and Loturco, Irineu (2018) Change of direction deficit in national team rugby union players: is there an Influence of playing position? Sports, 7 (1) , 2. ISSN 2075-4663 [Article] (doi:10.3390/sports7010002)

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published version (with publisher's formatting)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the change of direction (COD) ability and deficits of elite rugby union players, discriminating between position (backs and forwards), and between "faster and slower players", in multiple COD tasks. Twenty-four male rugby union players from the Brazilian senior National team completed the following assessments: Squat and countermovement jumps; drop jump; standing long jump, horizontal triple jumps; 40-m linear sprint; Pro-agility, L-Drill, and Zig-zag COD tests; and squat 1-repetition maximum. The differences between backs and forwards and between faster and slower performers were examined using magnitude-based inferences. Backs were faster (in both linear and COD speed tests) and jumped higher than forwards. Moreover, they generated an inferior sprint momentum. No differences were found in COD deficit between playing positions. However, when dividing the sample by median split, faster players outperformed their slower counterparts in all power⁻speed variables and presented higher COD deficits. These results suggest that separating rugby players by playing position might not discriminate players with different COD skills and that the median split analysis is more sensitive to identifying these differences. Furthermore, the present data indicate that faster rugby players are less efficient at changing direction and tolerating higher approach velocities in COD maneuvers.

Item Type: Article
Keywords (uncontrolled): agility, athletes, muscle power, sprint velocity, team sports
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute > Strength and Conditioning at the London Sport Institute
Item ID: 25923
Notes on copyright: © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access
article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Jisc Publications Router
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2019 13:10
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2021 07:39
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/25923

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Statistics

Downloads
Activity Overview
155Downloads
188Hits

Additional statistics are available via IRStats2.