Does study duration have opposite effects on recognition and repetition priming?

Berry, Christopher J., Ward, Emma V. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2076-832X and Shanks, David R. (2017) Does study duration have opposite effects on recognition and repetition priming? Journal of Memory and Language, 97 . pp. 154-174. ISSN 0749-596X [Article] (doi:10.1016/j.jml.2017.07.004)

[img]
Preview
PDF (© 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license) - Published version (with publisher's formatting)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF - Final accepted version (with author's formatting)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

We investigated whether manipulating the duration for which an item is studied has opposite effects on recognition memory and repetition priming, as has been reported by Voss and Gonsalves (2010). Robust evidence of this would support the idea that distinct explicit and implicit memory systems drive recognition and priming, and would constitute evidence against a single-system model (Berry, Shanks, Speekenbrink, & Henson, 2012). Across seven experiments using study durations ranging from 40 ms to 2250 ms, and two different priming tasks (a classification task in Experiments 1a, 2a, 3a, and 4, and a continuous identification with recognition (CID-R) task in Experiments 1b, 2b, and 3b), we found that although a longer study duration improved subsequent recognition in each experiment, there was either no detectable effect on priming (Experiments 1a, 2a, and 4) or a similar effect to that on recognition, albeit smaller in magnitude (Experiments 1b, 2b, 3a, and 3b). Our findings (1) question whether study duration has opposite effects on recognition and priming, and (2) are robustly consistent with a single-system model of recognition and priming.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Psychology
Item ID: 22375
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Emma Ward
Date Deposited: 18 Aug 2017 12:40
Last Modified: 14 Aug 2020 09:04
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/22375

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item