Blood perfusion changes during sacral nerve root stimulation versus surface gluteus electrical stimulation on in seated spinal cord injury

Liu, Liang Q. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6358-1637 and Ferguson-Pell, Martin W. (2019) Blood perfusion changes during sacral nerve root stimulation versus surface gluteus electrical stimulation on in seated spinal cord injury. Assistive Technology: the Official Journal of RESNA, 31 (1) . pp. 1-8. ISSN 1040-0435 [Article] (doi:10.1080/10400435.2017.1340360)

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Abstract

Objective: To examine dynamic changes of ischial blood perfusion during sacral nerve root stimulation against surface functional electrical stimulation (FES). Methods: Fourteen adults with suprasacral complete spinal cord injury were recruited. The gluteal maximus was activated by surface FES or stimulating sacral nerve roots by functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) or a sacral anterior root stimulator implant (SARS). Ischial skin index of haemoglobin (IHB) and oxygenation (IOX) was measured. Results: Skin blood perfusion was significantly higher during FMS than the baseline (IHB 1.05±0.21 before vs. 1.08±0.02 during stimulation, P=0.03; IOX 0.18 ± 0.21 before vs. 0.46 ± 0.30, P=0.01 during stimulation, n=6). Similarly, when using the SARS implant, we also observed that blood perfusion significantly increased (IHB 1.01 ± 0.02 before vs. 1.07 ±0.02 during stimulation, P=0.003; IOX 0.79±0.81 before vs. 2.2±1.21 during stimulation, P=0.03, n=6). However, there was no significant change of blood perfusion during surface FES. Among 4 participants who completed both the FMS and FES studies, the magnitude of increase in both parameters was significantly higher during FMS. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that using SARS implant is more efficient to activate gluteal muscles and confer better benefit on blood perfusion than applying traditional FES in SCI population.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Health and Education > Adult, Child and Midwifery
Item ID: 21883
Notes on copyright: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Assistive Technology: the Official Journal of RESNA on 29/09/2017 available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10400435.2017.1340360
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Depositing User: Liang Liu
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2017 15:29
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2021 06:14
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/21883

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