The acute effects of heavy sled towing on subsequent sprint acceleration performance

Jarvis, Paul, Turner, Anthony N. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5121-432X, Chavda, Shyam ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7745-122X and Bishop, Chris ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1505-1287 (2017) The acute effects of heavy sled towing on subsequent sprint acceleration performance. Journal of Trainology, 6 (1) . pp. 18-25. ISSN 2186-5264 [Article] (doi:10.17338/trainology.6.1_18)

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Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the practical use of heavy sled towing and its acute implications on subsequent sprint acceleration performance.

Design and Methods: Eight healthy male varsity team sport athletes (age: 21.8±1.8years, height: 185.5±5.0cm, weight: 88.8±15.7kg, 15m sprint time: 2.66±0.13s) performed sprints under three separate weighted sled towing conditions in a randomized order. Each condition consisted of one baseline unweighted sprint (4-min pre), the sled towing sprint protocol: (1) 1x50% body mass, (2) 2x50% body mass, (3) 3x50% body mass (multiple sprints interspersed with 90s recovery), and 3 post-testing unweighted sprints thereafter (4, 8, 12-min post). All sprints were conducted over a 15m distance.

Results: Significantly faster sprint times for the 3x sled towing protocol were identified following 8-min of rest (p=0.025, d=0.46, 2.64±0.15s to 2.57±0.17s). When individual best sprint times were analyzed against baseline data, significantly faster sprint times were identified following both 1x (p=0.007, d=0.69, 2.69±0.07s to 2.64±0.07s) and 3x (p=0.001, d=0.62, 2.64±0.15s to 2.55±0.14s) sled towing protocols. Within the 3x condition, all athletes achieved fastest sprint times following 8–12 min of rest.

Conclusions: The findings from the present study indicate that a repeated bout of sled towing (3x50% body mass) leads to the enhancement in subsequent sprint acceleration performance, following adequate, and individualized recovery periods.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute
Item ID: 21824
Notes on copyright: Permission to reproduce granted by Journal of Trainology.
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Depositing User: Jennifer Basford
Date Deposited: 12 May 2017 13:31
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2021 14:41
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/21824

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