The emotional impact of learning in small groups: highlighting the impact on student progression and retention

Cartney, Patricia (2006) The emotional impact of learning in small groups: highlighting the impact on student progression and retention. Teaching in Higher Education, 11 (1). pp. 79-91. ISSN 1356-2517

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Abstract

Student progression and retention is an area of increasing social importance and concern around student non-completion rates is expressed in many arenas. Research suggests many reasons for student non-completion, including the balancing of social and academic integration into university life. The increasing diversity of the student body potentially militates against such integration. Discourse here has tended either to problematise the student (seeking to identify and remedy their alleged deficits and differences), or the teacher (adopting a narrowly ‘technological’, a-theoretical approach to teaching and learning). Both approaches de-contextualise the issue removing it from the social nexus which is at the heart of the learning and teaching environment. This article seeks to redress this by placing the social nexus at the core of its approach to progression and retention. Drawing upon group work theory we explore the role of small group learning in promoting social and academic integration.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Health and Education
ISI Impact: 11
Item ID: 9311
Depositing User: Aran Lewis
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2012 09:27
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2016 11:51
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/9311

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