A review of motivation and management of helpline volunteers within charity A.

Wheeler, Louise (2010) A review of motivation and management of helpline volunteers within charity A. Masters thesis, Middlesex University.

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Abstract

Charity A is a charitable organisation which helps men who have been sexually violated (either as a child or adult) and raises awareness of their needs. It delivers this through the provision of a helpline run by volunteers, a dedicated counseling service and by advocating the needs of men who have experienced sexual violation. The author is a trustee on the board of directors and is currently leading a strategic review for the organisation. During the course the strategic review it was identified that the volunteer management strategy and practice was in need of evaluation, as it was unclear at board level what initiatives were place relating to volunteer management. As a result the organisation is currently not aware of whether the volunteer organisation is going to operate or develop in 2010/11 and beyond and further how it would achieve such operation or development. Gaining an understanding of what motivates helpline volunteers to participate was considered to be a key consideration. The objective of this paper is provide recommendations for Charity A, that can be realistically considered for implementation and applied in the organisational strategy development in relation to the helpline volunteers. The volunteer resource for this charity is their human resource, this study seeks to understand the applicability and suitability of HRM/D concepts to the management of volunteers. The methods used in gathering data and making recommendations for this research include quantitative and qualitative surveys, incorporating descriptive and analytical elements, interviews, systematic and participative observation. In order to build realistic recommendations and a holistic perspective, participation from board members, volunteers and the volunteer manager was encouraged. The literature review includes aspects of volunteerism such as how it sits within the United Kingdom, definitions and their implications, application of HR theories to volunteerism, current best practice in terms of volunteer management and an exploration into the field of volunteer motivation. Considerations of relevant literature and the results of research led to the conclusion: ‣ Volunteer management appears to be emergent as opposed to strategic in nature ‣ There is no current volunteer management strategy ‣ There are no formal initiatives to consolidate information leading to regular monitoring and improvement of recruitment, retention, engagement, volunteer motivation and learning and development. ‣ Volunteer motivation is not considered on a formal or board level The impact of this is this approach to volunteer management is that no-one in the organisation can foresee how or if the volunteer organisation is going to develop or mitigate risks in the future. The recommendations seek to address these issues. The recommendations highlight areas where initiatives are needed and provide some implementable options, however, they are for consideration purposes only. A final approach to building a new volunteer strategy and strengthening volunteer management practice whilst incorporating the motivations of volunteers should be agreed at board and management level after the 2010/11 organisational strategy is finalised. The primary recommendations are as follows: •A volunteer organisational strategy is designed and implemented •A formal volunteer management toolkit is implemented. Development of formal initiatives leading to regular monitoring and improvement of volunteer recruitment, performance, retention, engagement, motivation and learning and development.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information:

Dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the MA HRD.

Research Areas:Middlesex University Schools and Centres > Business School > Leadership, Work and Organisations
Masters and Doctorates > Theses
ID Code:7926
Deposited On:01 Jun 2011 12:12
Last Modified:18 Jul 2014 14:26

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