Should active recruitment of health workers from sub-Saharan Africa be viewed as a crime?

Mills, Edward J. and Schabas, William A. and Volmink, Jimmy and Walker, Roderick and Ford, Nathan and Katabira, Elly and Anema, Aranka and Joffres, Michel and Cahn, Pedro and Montaner, Julio (2008) Should active recruitment of health workers from sub-Saharan Africa be viewed as a crime? The Lancet, 371 (9613). pp. 685-688. ISSN 0140-6736

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Abstract

Shortages of health-care staff are endemic in sub-Saharan Africa (table). Overall, there is one physician for every 8000 people in the region. In the worst affected countries, such as Malawi, the physician-to-population ratio is just 0·02 for every 1000 (one per 50 000). There are also huge disparities between rural and urban areas: rural parts of South Africa have 14 times fewer doctors than the national average. These numbers are very different to those in developed countries: the UK, for example, has over 100 times more physicians per population than Malawi. Furthermore, almost one in ten doctors working in the UK are from Africa. The insufficiency of health staff to provide even basic services is one of the most pressing impediments to health-care delivery in resource-poor settings. The consequences are clearly shown by the inverse relation that exists between health-care worker density and mortality.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Law > Law and Politics
ISI Impact: 27
Item ID: 7700
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Devika Mohan
Date Deposited: 18 Apr 2011 07:03
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2016 14:22
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/7700

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