An automatic tracking analysis of the movement velocities of national level basketball guards, forwards and centres.

Vuckovic, Goran and Dezman, Brane and Perse, Matthew and Kristan, Matej and Pers, Janez and Kovacic, Stane and James, Nicolas (2009) An automatic tracking analysis of the movement velocities of national level basketball guards, forwards and centres. In: Book of abstracts of the international scientific conference of theoretical, methodological and methodical aspects of competition and athletes’ preparation. Juhas, Irina and Koprivica, Vladimir, eds. University of Belgrade, Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, p. 38. ISBN 9788680255606

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Abstract

Introduction. Knowledge of the physical demands undertaken by basketball players during the match can help coaches to develop appropriate training regimes and optimise players'performances. A notational analysis has been assessed on many occasions to evaluate a player's activity profiles for different types of player. Conse- quently, movement patterns were not described in physical units. The aim of this study is to analyse players' movement intensities in respect to different velocity classes and to distinguish differences between diferent types of players by using computer-vision technology. Methods. 15 players were recorded with two video cameras fastened to the ceiling. Digital images were proc- essed by the SAGIT tracking system and movement intensity was classified into 4 different velocity categories (walking, slow run, fast run and sprint). The percentage of time players spent in each velocity class was as- sessed using a three way repeated measures ANOVA. Results. The two way interactions between velocity class and quarter (F = 2.34, df = 9, 405; p < 0.05) and velocity class and position (F = 11.64, df = 6, 405; p < 0.001) suggested that the different playing positions undertook different amounts of work and these were influenced by the period of the game in which they were playing. Specifically the amount of time spent in slower movement classes tended to greater during the earlier time periods and as time progressed the amount of time spent in faster movement categories decreased. Conclusion. These results suggest that further work is needed to assess the practical application of the findings. For example, to what extent does a player's velocity relate to the different role being undertaken. For example when players gain possession of the ball as the play transits from defence to offence are the highest velocities reached? Therefore, we need to explore movement patterns in defence, offence and during transitions.

Item Type:Book Section
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Research paper presented at the International Scientific Conference of theoretical, methodological and methodical aspects of competition and athletes’ preparation, Belgrade, Serbia, December 2009.

Research Areas:Middlesex University Schools and Centres > School of Science and Technology > Sports
Middlesex University Schools and Centres > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute > Performance Analysis at the London Sport Institute
ID Code:7314
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Deposited On:18 Mar 2011 08:52
Last Modified:28 Oct 2014 17:16

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