The effects of creatine supplementation on cardiovascular, metabolic, and thermoregulatory responses during exercise in the heat in endurance-trained humans.

Kilduff, Liam P. and Georgiades, Evelina and James, Nicolas and Minnion, R. H. and Mitchell, M. and Kingsmore, D. and Hadjicharlambous, M. and Pitsiladis, Yannis P. (2004) The effects of creatine supplementation on cardiovascular, metabolic, and thermoregulatory responses during exercise in the heat in endurance-trained humans. International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 14 (4). pp. 446-463. ISSN 1526-484X

Full text is not in this repository.

This item is available in the Library Catalogue

Abstract

The effects of creatine (Cr) supplementation on cardiovascular, metabolic, and thermoregulatory responses, and on the capacity of trained humans to perform prolonged exercise in the heat was examined. Endurance-trained males (n = 21) performed 2 constant-load exercise tests to exhaustion at 63 ± 5 % VO in the heat (ambient temperature: 30.3 ± 0.5 °C) before and after 7 d of Cr (20 g × d-1 Cr + 140 g × d-1 glucose polymer) or placebo. Cr increased intracellular water and reduced thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses (e.g., heart rate, rectal temperature, sweat rate) but did not significantly increase time to exhaustion (47.0 ± 4.7 min vs. 49.7 ± 7.5 min, P = 0.095). Time to exhaustion was increased significantly in subjects whose estimated intramuscular Cr levels were substantially increased (“responders”: 47.3 ± 4.9 min vs. 51.7 ± 7.4 min, P = 0.031). Cr-induced hyperhydration can result in a more efficient thermoregulatory response during prolonged exercise in the heat.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:School of Health and Education > London Sport Institute
Citations on ISI Web of Science:21
ID Code:7282
Useful Links:
Deposited On:16 Mar 2011 09:49
Last Modified:06 Feb 2013 12:34

Repository staff only: item control page

Full text downloads (NB count will be zero if no full text documents are attached to the record)

Downloads per month over the past year