The implications of de-collectivist industrial relations laws and associated developments for worker health and safety in Australia, 1996–2007.

Quinlan, Michael and Johnstone, Richard (2009) The implications of de-collectivist industrial relations laws and associated developments for worker health and safety in Australia, 1996–2007. Industrial Relations Journal, 40 (5). pp. 426-443. ISSN 1468-2338

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Abstract

The institutional and regulatory interlinkages between industrial relations (IR) and occupational health and safety (OHS) are seldom explored in the IR literature. This article begins to address this gap by examining regulatory initiatives in Australia during a period of neoliberal government. It examines the laws enacted by the federal government during this period and events and cases arising from these laws that go some way to illustrating their effects. Evidence is also drawn from detailed research on a number of state OHS inspectorates between 2004 and 2006. It is argued that de-collectivist changes to IR laws exacerbated problems posed by the growth of flexible work arrangements and a drop in union density, weakening participatory provisions in OHS laws and promoting work arrangements that undermined OHS standards. The study provides evidence of the implications of a divergence in the trajectory of IR and OHS laws and the importance of better integrating worker protection laws.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > Business School
Item ID: 7092
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Ms Jyoti Zade
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2011 14:45
Last Modified: 16 Dec 2015 19:40
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/7092

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