“I will accept whatever is meant for us. I wait for that-day and night”: the search for healing at a Muslim shrine in Pakistan.

Pirani, Farida and Papadopoulos, Irena and Foster, John and Leavey, Gerard (2008) “I will accept whatever is meant for us. I wait for that-day and night”: the search for healing at a Muslim shrine in Pakistan. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 11 (4). pp. 375-386. ISSN 1367-4676

Full text is not in this repository.

Abstract

This paper describes an ethnographic perspective on the role of a Muslim shrine in Pakistan. Most shrines in Muslim countries represent the Sufi tradition in Islam where followers seek healing and fulfilment of their wishes using Sufi saints as intermediaries. In Pakistan, the shrine of Hazrat Abdullah Shah Ashabi provides a significant religious, social, physical, and psychological resource where people engage in religious rituals, community living and healing rituals to address physical, emotional, and social ailments. In addition to the explanatory models of misfortune described by the informants, gender, poverty, availability of formal health services, and social support seem to play a significant role in emphasizing the position of the Sufi shrine in a Muslim setting.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:School of Health and Education > Mental Health, Social Work and Interprofessional Learning
ID Code:6215
Useful Links:
Deposited On:06 Jul 2010 09:31
Last Modified:13 Oct 2014 15:31

Repository staff only: item control page

Full text downloads (NB count will be zero if no full text documents are attached to the record)

Downloads per month over the past year