Enhancement of intragastric acid stability of a fat emulsion meal delays gastric emptying and increases cholecystokinin release and gallbladder contraction.

Marciani, Luca and Wickham, Martin and Singh, Gulzar and Bush, Debbie and Pick, Barbara and Cox, Eleanor F. and Fillery-Travis, Annette and Faulks, Richard and Spiller, Robin C. and Gowland, Penny (2007) Enhancement of intragastric acid stability of a fat emulsion meal delays gastric emptying and increases cholecystokinin release and gallbladder contraction. American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 292 . pp. 1607-1613. ISSN 0193-1857

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Abstract

Preprocessed fatty foods often contain calories added as a fat emulsion stabilized by emulsifiers. Emulsion stability in the acidic gastric environment can readily be manipulated by altering emulsifier chemistry. We tested the hypothesis that it would be possible to control gastric emptying, CCK release, and satiety by varying intragastric fat emulsion stability. Nine healthy volunteers received a test meal on two occasions, comprising a 500-ml 15% oil emulsion with 2.5% of one of two emulsifiers that produced emulsions that were either stable (meal A) or unstable (meal B) in the acid gastric environment. Gastric emptying and gallbladder volume changes were assessed by MRI. CCK plasma levels were measured and satiety scores were recorded. Meal B layered rapidly owing to fat emulsion breakdown. The gastric half-emptying time of the aqueous phase was faster for meal B (72 ± 13 min) than for meal A (171 ± 35 min, P < 0.008). Meal A released more CCK than meal B (integrated areas, respectively 1,095 ± 244 and 531 ± 111 pmol·min·l–1, P < 0.02), induced a greater gallbladder contraction (P < 0.02), and decreased postprandial appetite (P < 0.05), although no significant differences were observed in fullness and hunger. We conclude that acid-stable emulsions delayed gastric emptying and increased postprandial CCK levels and gallbladder contraction, whereas acid-instability led to rapid layering of fat in the gastric lumen with accelerated gastric emptying, lower CCK levels, and reduced gallbladder contraction. Manipulation of the acid stability of fat emulsion added to preprocessed foods could maximize satiety signaling and, in turn, help to reduce overconsumption of calories.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:School of Media and Performing Arts > Media & Performing Arts
Institute for Work Based Learning
Citations on ISI Web of Science:27
ID Code:5969
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Deposited On:28 May 2010 15:32
Last Modified:02 Jul 2014 11:43

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