Discourses on Research and the PhD in Design

Durling, David (2002) Discourses on Research and the PhD in Design. Quality Assurance in Education., 10 (2). pp. 79-85. ISSN 0968-4883

Full text is not in this repository.

Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09684880210423564

This item is available in the Library Catalogue

Abstract

Durling's other main scholarly interest is in PhD studies for designers, and in developing the quality of doctoral supervision, training, and resources. This output relates to an invited paper on doctoral studies in design, located in an education journal. The paper gives an overview of the beginnings of doctoral studies in design, especially in the UK, and deals with the nature of PhD research and issues of doctoral standards arising from practice-based PhDs and their supervision. It draws upon and references international debates around these issues, concluding with a case study for design PhD process which was adopted as a university model of best practice. Durling has had a long association with addressing standards in doctoral studies. He has organised 2 of the conferences 'Doctoral Education in Design' (La Clusaz 2000, and Tsukuba 2003), spoken on the subject by invitation at many symposia (for example: Brazil 2001; IDSA 2002; AHRB 2002; NAFAE 2004; MIRIAD 2004; DRS 'Rising Stars' 2005; 'In Theory' 2007), and edited special editions of peer reviewed journals on the subject. He has helped foster an international debate by founding the PHD-DESIGN discussion list http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/phd-design For several years he has organised doctoral training events culminating in the Design Advanced Research Training (DART) collaborative training scheme, together with building resources for doctoral students in design.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:School of Art and Design > Art & Design
ID Code:480
Deposited On:14 Nov 2008 15:01
Last Modified:18 Mar 2014 06:40

Repository staff only: item control page

Full text downloads (NB count will be zero if no full text documents are attached to the record)

Downloads per month over the past year