The Making of the Indian national innovation systems: lessons on the specific characteristics of the domestic and the external co-evolutions of technologies, institutions and incentives.

Baskaran, Angathevar and Muchie, Mammo (2007) The Making of the Indian national innovation systems: lessons on the specific characteristics of the domestic and the external co-evolutions of technologies, institutions and incentives. Working Paper. DIIPER & Department of History, International and Social Studies.

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Abstract

India is one of the few large economies that have functioning national systems of innovation. It has followed largely a period when self-reliance and selective and guided intervention in the world economy prevailed until the early 1990s when liberalisation of the economy took off. Its economy now is growing at a nearly 8 % of GDP and is seen as an emerging economy on a par with China. The policy makers in India have asked: can India become a developed country by 2020? (see Kalam, 1998). India has tried to apply science and technology to industrialise agriculture and build a modern economy. To this day despite the splendid achievements, India has not escaped from underdevelopment, poverty and inequalities. The specification of the peculiarities and characteristics of India’s system of innovation by taking various indicators is critical to undertake. India’s strategy for building its national system of innovation has borne always a dualistic and lopsided feature in terms of priorities for science and technology selection and foresight, policies for supporting science, technology and innovation, creating institutions and their linkages, knowledge and learning, capability and training, diffusion and incentives. Despite its significant achievements in areas such as building strong industrial and R & D base, establishing a large number of science and technology institutions, and creating large pool of scientists and engineers, the Indian national innovation system has been criticised for its low quality manufactured good, and inability to eradicate poverty. Key issues taken up for this paper are:

Item Type:Monograph (Working Paper)
Research Areas:Business School > Accounting and Finance
ID Code:4201
Permissions granted by publisher:Openly Available
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Deposited On:26 Feb 2010 11:43
Last Modified:08 Oct 2014 18:48

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