Analysis and evaluation on acupuncture treatment of cervical pains in the UK: a study of 74 cases.

Jiang, Dan and Cheng, Ming Zhao (2009) Analysis and evaluation on acupuncture treatment of cervical pains in the UK: a study of 74 cases. East-West Integration Medicine, 4 (3). pp. 36-43. ISSN 1872-0064

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Abstract

Cervicodynia, or cervical pain or neck pain, is a common condition in modern societies. There are particularly higher occurrences in white collar workers who use the computer for their work. Modern societies’ internal and external injuries, such as car accidents and stress, increase the morbidity of cervical pain. As it is effective and safe, acupuncture has become one of the most used treatment method. Within the acceptable treatment frequency, a combination of a variety of acupuncture techniques was used: selection of acupoints according to syndrome differentiation, local selection of acupoints and one needle treatment were used. When necessary, Chinese herbal medicines were used as assistance to reach an appropriate treatment level and the best results. From the feedback of 74 questionnaires of the patients who received the treatment, this report aims to evaluate objectively the results and the safety of acupuncture treatment to cervical pain. Of the 74 cases, 68 (91%) had routine orthodox medicine treatments and the results were negative. 18 cases (24%) had other complementary treatments and the results were negative. In contrast, acupuncture treatments had better results. 16 cases (22%) had the pain under total control, 29 cases (39%) much better, 20 cases (27%) better, 9 cases (12%) no change and no case was worse. The total effective rate was 88%. These results confirm that acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment for cervical pain. Using a combination of traditional Chinese acupuncture techniques to reach an appropriate treatment level is a key element in obtaining these results.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:Middlesex University Schools and Centres > School of Health and Education > Mental Health, Social Work and Interprofessional Learning
ID Code:3986
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Deposited On:22 Feb 2010 14:27
Last Modified:10 Oct 2014 09:51

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