Witchcraft and kingship in the North Berwick witch-hunt and Shakespeare's Macbeth.

Normand, Lawrence (2002) Witchcraft and kingship in the North Berwick witch-hunt and Shakespeare's Macbeth. In: Culture and Power. Walton, David and Scheu, Dagmar, eds. Verlag Peter Lang AG, Bern, pp. 213-227. ISBN 3-906769-95-X

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Abstract

This essay explores two historical moments when unofficial knowledge of early modern witchcraft came into contact with the knowledge and ideology of the established political order: the North Berwick witch-hunt (1590-91), and Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606). In the former, an inchoate set of cultural practices came to be violently redefined as witchcraft as part of dominant religious and political knowledge. In Macbeth unofficial knowledge of witchcraft has its own uncanny power, and is not subjected by the systematic, elite knowledge of demonologies. Rather Macbeth widens the gap between ruling-class ideology and witchcraft's indefinable power.

Item Type:Book Section
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Also a paper given at ‘Culture and Power’, University of Murcia, Spain, 2000.

Research Areas:School of Media and Performing Arts > Media > English Language and Literature
ID Code:374
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Deposited On:10 Nov 2008 14:32
Last Modified:13 May 2014 15:23

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