Aliens, migrants and maids: public discourses of Irish immigration to Britain in 1937

Ryan, Louise (2001) Aliens, migrants and maids: public discourses of Irish immigration to Britain in 1937. Immigrants and Minorities, 20 (3). pp. 25-42. ISSN 0261-9288

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02619288.2001.9975021

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Abstract

This article examines public discourses on Irish immigration to Britain through an analysis of two separate but related documentary sources from the year 1937: the Liverpool press and the official report, ‘Migration to Great Britain from the Irish Free State: Report of the Inter‐departmental Committee’. Through these sources an examination is undertaken of some of the overlaps and tensions between central government and a specific local context. The article also discusses the gendering processes which, despite the acknowledged preponderance of women among the immigrants, continued to focus almost exclusively on male ‘navvies’. The only women explicitly discussed by the interdepartmental committee were a group of factory ‘girls ‘ in Aylesbury. The majority of Irish women who worked in the private sphere of domestic service were ignored or perhaps deliberately excluded.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:Middlesex University Schools and Centres > School of Law > Criminology and Sociology
Middlesex University Schools and Centres > School of Law > Social Policy Research Centre
ID Code:3617
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Deposited On:12 Jan 2010 12:11
Last Modified:24 Nov 2014 17:00

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