Sex and cross-cultural differences in the estimated multi-faceted intelligence quotient score for self, parents and siblings

Furnham, Adrian and Fong, Geraldyn and Martin, G. Neil (1999) Sex and cross-cultural differences in the estimated multi-faceted intelligence quotient score for self, parents and siblings. Personality and Individual Differences, 26 (6). pp. 1025-1034. ISSN 0191-8869

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0191-8869(98)00201-3

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Abstract

Over four hundred young people from Britain, Hawaii and Singapore estimated their own, their parents and their siblings IQ score on each of Gardner (1983) fundamental human intelligences: verbal (linguistic), logical (mathematical), spatial, musical, body-kinesthetic, interpersonal and intrapersonal. They also answered six simple questions concerning intelligence tests. There were both cultural and sex differences in the estimation of overall own intelligence score. Males gave higher scores than females (109 vs 107) while the British gave the highest score (109) compared with the Singaporeans (106) and Hawaiians (104). Factor analysis of the seven dimensions yielded either a two or three factor solution, the latter being verbal (verbal, inter-intrapersonal), mathematical (mathematical and spatial), and musical (musical, body-kinesthetic). There were consistent sex differences in the estimations of the three factors for self, but not of parents, and only marginally of sisters. Males more than females, and the British more than the other groups, were more likely to believe in sex and race difference in intelligence.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:Middlesex University Schools and Centres > School of Health and Education > Health & Education
ID Code:3481
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Deposited On:21 Dec 2009 06:02
Last Modified:09 Jan 2014 07:55

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