Occupational stressors and coping as determinants of burnout in female hospice nurses

Payne, Nicola (2001) Occupational stressors and coping as determinants of burnout in female hospice nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 33 (3). pp. 396-405. ISSN 0309-2402

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Official URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/1207136...

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Abstract

Aims. Stressors, coping and demographic variables were examined as predictors of burnout in a sample of hospice nurses. The study aimed to investigate the level of burnout among hospice nurses; to ascertain which aspects of nursing work were positively or negatively related to burnout; to examine the relative contributions made by these different variables and to suggest individual and organizational interventions to reduce levels of burnout. Methods. Eighty-nine female nurses from nine hospices completed a battery of questionnaires comprising the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Nursing Stress Scale, Ways of Coping Scale and a demographic information form. Results. In general, the level of burnout (characterized by high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization of patients and low personal accomplishment) was found to be low. In multiple regression analyses, 'death and dying', "conflict with staff', 'accepting responsibility' and higher nursing grade contributed to emotional exhaustion. 'Conflict with staff', 'inadequate preparation', 'escape' and reduced 'planful problem-solving' contributed to depersonalization. 'Inadequate preparation', 'escape', reduced 'positive reappraisal' and fewer professional qualifications contributed to lower levels of personal accomplishment. Overall, stressors made the greatest contribution to burnout and demographic factors contributed the least. Conclusions. The importance of not labelling individuals as good and bad 'copers' was discussed, as the effectiveness of a strategy may depend on the situation. It was concluded that the investigation of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping in relation to burnout, was oversimplifying the coping-burnout relationship. Suggestions for stress management included staff training in counselling skills, monitoring staff conflict, implementing stress inoculation training to teach appropriate use of coping skills and finally, monitoring particularly vulnerable groups of hospice staff such as unqualified nursing assistants and qualified nurses in management positions. It was concluded that despite the difficult nature of hospice work, the hospice is a positive environment in which to work.

Item Type:Article
Research Areas:School of Health and Education > Health & Education
Citations on ISI Web of Science:59
ID Code:2992
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Deposited On:05 Nov 2009 05:47
Last Modified:23 Jan 2014 07:10

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