Segmentation, unity, and a church divided: a critical history of churches in Nagaland, 1947-2017

Jamir, Chongpongmeren (2019) Segmentation, unity, and a church divided: a critical history of churches in Nagaland, 1947-2017. PhD thesis, Middlesex University / Oxford Centre for Mission Studies.

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Abstract

This is a study of the distinctive formation of the Christian churches in Nagaland during 1947-2017. It argues that the major clues to understanding Naga church history are to be found in the cultural milieu of Nagaland. Thus, using a cultural history methodology, the ecclesiastical events described in this research were examined in the cultural framework of the segmentary Naga society and the changing political, social and religious environment in the region, giving close attention to how they affected the contours of the ecclesiastical history. It posited that segmentation as a cultural characteristic of the Naga society effected both unity and divisiveness in the Naga churches, which subsequently shaped the beliefs and practices of the churches in the region.

Archival data in the form of reports, records and minutes of meetings were collected from church and government offices. Qualitative data was collected through interviews with leaders and key eyewitnesses of various events discussed in the research. Using a semi-structured questionnaire in these interviews allowed the interviewee to tell the story in their own words. Though primary textual sources were used to establish the state of churches in Nagaland prior to 1947, the main focus of this research is limited to the period 1947 to 2017.

This research retells the story of the Naga church in a state of India with Christian majority. The ethnic status the Christian faith assumed, the extent of its identification with the local culture, and the scope of the mission of the Naga churches as key stakeholders in society, offers a new angle to the history of Christianity in India. As an historical study of churches within the geographical confines of Nagaland this research is hoped to be a tool for the churches’ self-evaluation in the region and beyond.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Research Areas: A. > School of Law
B. > Theses
C. Collaborative Partners > Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Item ID: 27960
Depositing User: Brigitte Joerg
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2019 09:44
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2019 10:16
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/27960

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