Privilege, power, and the perversion of privacy protection

Jones, Mariette W. (2019) Privilege, power, and the perversion of privacy protection. In: Comparative Perspectives on Privacy in an Internet Era. Weaver, Russell L., Reichel, Jane and Friedland, Steven I., eds. Global Papers Series, VII (VII). Carolina Academic Press, Durham, North Carolina, pp. 141-164. ISBN 9781531009571

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Abstract

This essay examines the tension between individual privacy and the societal need for protection against terrorists, as well as the tradeoffs that societies contemplate in order to protect themselves. It is noted that privacy protections run the risk of becoming a tool of the powerful, analogous to the (alleged) abuse of pre-reform libel laws. The nature of modern life has led to a de facto surrender of privacy rights. Indeed, quoting from the famous Warren and Brandeis article, it is arguable that a “true understanding of life lived fully in a modern state reveals that the average person is almost never ‘left alone.’ The effects of legislation such as the GDPR are examined to illustrate the point. Finally, while we acknowledge that, when privacy interests are weighed against security interests, the balance will usually favor security, it is questionable whether it can be proven that giving up more privacy rights would necessarily improve the security situation.

Item Type: Book Section
Research Areas: A. > School of Law > Law and Politics
Item ID: 25251
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Mariette Jones
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2018 10:11
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2019 14:40
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/25251

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