The games Europe plays

Boddington, Ghislaine (2016) The games Europe plays. [Show/Exhibition]

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Abstract

The Games Europe Plays brought to the UK independent and innovative games made in Europe with a strong emphasis on design, virtual interactivity and physical engagement.

A series of three shows which were curated by Creative Director, body technologist and digital expert Ghislaine Boddington, and funded and coordinated by EUNIC London were held across 6 months at The Finnish Institute, Stephen Lawrence Gallery and Nesta’s FutureFest 2016.

The exhibition at the Finnish Institute in London features children’s games Gigglebug (Finland), Toca Boca (Sweden), Tine Bech (Denmark/UK), Peter Lu & Lea Schönfelder (Germany) and Amanita (Czech Republic) looking at learning through play, identity, representation and future skills.

The Games Europe Plays – BODY <> TECH at
The Stephen Lawrence Gallery focused on exploring our body from its hidden micro bacteria to its digital incarnations, taking a playful look at how digital technologies are helping us to heal but can also disturb our wellbeing. Presenting the works of interactive artists and game makers from the UK and continental Europe, the show envisions how we will inhabit and take care of our virtual and physical bodies in the future.

Last stop in 2016 for The Games Europe Plays exhibition was as part of FutureFest, presenting ‘Molding the Signifier’ an installation by Ivor Diosi (Czech Republic), a digital performance by Marco Donnaruma (Italy) and supporting the performance of athletes and performers into FutureFest’s new digital commission, Collective Reality (UK).

“Gaming today has truly gone digital and is evolving into some wonderful new forms, enabling us to envision future scenarios in which gaming experiences are at the centre of work and play. New formats use the whole of our bodies into the game, both through physical interactions and through exploring digital representations of ourselves. Theses exhibitions allow us to explore a European perspective on the evolution of games for the future.” Ghislaine Boddington.

The Games Europe Plays was initiated by EUNIC London with the Czech Centre and coordinated by the Finnish Institute. Supported by the British Council, it was presented as part of the London Games Festival Fringe Programme, at the University of Greenwich and Nesta’s FutureFest 2016. With additional support from the Czech Centre, the Danish Embassy, the Goethe-Institut London and the Swedish Embassy.

Venue Details

  1. The Games Europe Plays - Kids and Young People
    • Location: Finnish Cultural institute, London
    • Dates: 02-10 April 2016

  2. The Games Europe Plays - Body Tech
    • Location: Stephen Lawrence Gallery, Greenwich
    • Dates: 07 July - 26 Aug 2016

  3. The Games Europe Plays - FutureFest
    • Location: FutureFest16, Nesta, Tobacco Docks London
    • Dates: 17-18 Sept 2016

Item Type: Show/Exhibition
Research Areas: A. > School of Media and Performing Arts > Performing Arts > Centre for Research into Creation in the Performing Arts (ResCen)
Item ID: 25013
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Ghislaine Boddington
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2018 10:15
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2020 18:25
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/25013

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