Acute and chronic effects of foam rolling vs eccentric exercise on ROM and force output of the plantar flexors

Aune, Anne A. G. and Bishop, Chris and Turner, Anthony N. and Papadopoulos, Konstantinos and Budd, Sarah and Richardson, Mark and Maloney, Sean J. (2018) Acute and chronic effects of foam rolling vs eccentric exercise on ROM and force output of the plantar flexors. Journal of Sports Sciences . pp. 1-8. ISSN 0264-0414 (Published online first)

[img] PDF - Final accepted version (with author's formatting)
Restricted to Repository staff and depositor only until 12 June 2019.

Download (539kB) |

Abstract

Foam rolling and eccentric exercise interventions have been demonstrated to improve range of motion (ROM). However, these two modalities have not been directly compared. Twenty-three academy soccer players (age: 18 ± 1; height: 1.74 ± 0.08 m; body mass: 69.3 ± 7.5 kg) were randomly allocated to either a foam rolling (FR) or eccentric exercise intervention designed to improve dorsiflexion ROM. Participants performed the intervention daily for a duration of four weeks. Measurements of dorsiflexion ROM, isometric plantar flexion torque and drop jump reactive strength index were taken at baseline (pre-intervention) and at three subsequent time-points (30-min post, 24-hours post and 4-weeks post). A significant time x group interaction effect was observed for dorsiflexion (P = 0.036), but not for torque or reactive strength index. For dorsiflexion, there was a significant increase in both acute (30-min; P < 0.001) and chronic (4-week; P < 0.001) ROM for the eccentric group, whilst FR exhibited only an acute improvement (P < 0.001). Eccentric training would appear a more efficacious modality than foam rolling for improving dorsiflexion ROM in elite academy soccer players.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From PubMed via Jisc Publications Router.
Keywords (uncontrolled): Self-myofascial release, ankle, flexibility, power, range of motion, reactive strength index
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute
A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute > Strength and Conditioning at the London Sport Institute
Item ID: 24497
Notes on copyright: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 12/06/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02640414.2018.1486000
Useful Links:
SWORD Depositor: Jisc Publications Router
Depositing User: Jisc Publications Router
Date Deposited: 04 Jul 2018 14:00
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2018 09:43
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/24497

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item

Full text downloads (NB count will be zero if no full text documents are attached to the record)

Downloads per month over the past year