How can we design tactile interactive software for argument construction in criminal intelligence analysis?

Groenewald, Celeste and Wong, B. L. William and Attfield, Simon and Passmore, Peter J. and Kodagoda, Neesha (2017) How can we design tactile interactive software for argument construction in criminal intelligence analysis? In: 13th Bi-annual International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM13), 20-23 June 2017, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom.

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Abstract

Argumentation construction refers to the different ways in which people can formulate a well defined argument that can withstand scrutiny in a court of law. Different domains have enhanced the research on argumentation construction, but each enhancement relates either to ‘evidence’ or to the ‘relevance of evidence’, thus making these elements the corner stone elements of argumentation construction. By attempting to understand how Criminal Intelligence Analysts understand and manage these corner stone elements, as well as how these elements differ to the law domain counterparts, we aspire to formulate design guidelines for a software program that is tailored to how Criminal Intelligence Analysts think and argue during sense-making activities. This paper outlines the relevant literature and why the researchers consider ‘evidence’ and the ‘relevance of evidence’ as the corner stone elements of argumentation construction. The results section summarises the outcomes of two qualitative studies. The first study aims to understand how Criminal Intelligence Analysts perceive and manage uncertain information and how this eventually leads to the creation of evidence (as exhibits) for a court of law. The second study aims to understand how Criminal Intelligence Analysts know which information is relevant for the task at hand, especially when uncertainty is high. The results of the two studies still need to be combined and put into practise (as design guidelines) to test the effectiveness and validity of the results obtained in the two studies. This is listed as future work in the conclusion section.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Computer Science
Item ID: 23714
Notes on copyright: This is the accepted manuscript of a paper published in its final form in NDM13 Naturalistic Decision Making and Uncertainty: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making, 20-23 June 2017, Bath, UK, edited by Julie Gore and Paul Ward. Reproduced with permission of The University of Bath, School of Management Research Office.
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Depositing User: Simon Attfield
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2018 19:01
Last Modified: 24 Nov 2018 16:44
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/23714

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