Social, cognitive, behavioural and neighbourhood characteristics associated with sedentary time in men and women living in deprived neighbourhoods

Watts, Paul and Shahid, Mahwish and Bertotti, Marcello and Tobi, Patrick (2017) Social, cognitive, behavioural and neighbourhood characteristics associated with sedentary time in men and women living in deprived neighbourhoods. European Journal of Sport Science, 17 (7). pp. 904-912. ISSN 1746-1391

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Abstract

Multiple individual and neighbourhood characteristics are theorised to influence adult sedentary behaviour. The aim of this study was to examine associations between individual and neighbourhood-level characteristics in 40 deprived neighbourhoods in London, UK. A cross-sectional design was utilised with baseline data from the Well London Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial in 40 deprived neighbourhoods in London. Multilevel linear regression was used to examine associations between individual characteristics (measured by household survey), neighbourhood characteristics (neighbourhood audit, GIS and routinely available datasets) and sedentary behaviour (sitting time). Individual-level positive mental well-being and health behaviours were associated with sedentary time. Individual-level social networks were associated with decreased sedentary time in men and increased sedentary time in women. Neighbourhood-level measures of social networks and perceived neighbourhood quality were associated with reduced sedentary time. Fifteen per cent of the variance in sedentary time was attributable to differences at the neighbourhood level (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.15). These findings suggest that social networks at the individual and neighbourhood levels, collective perceptions of neighbourhood quality, individual-level positive mental well-being and other health behaviours may be important components of interventions developed to reduce sedentary time in deprived populations.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Natural Sciences
Item ID: 23444
Notes on copyright: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Sport Science on 11/05/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17461391.2017.1323951
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Depositing User: Patrick Tobi
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2018 15:35
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2018 16:11
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/23444

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