Single women living alone in later life: a short review; understanding society

Khan, Hafiz T. A. and Hafford-Letchfield, Trish and Lambert, Nicky (2018) Single women living alone in later life: a short review; understanding society. In: Sexuality, Sexual and Gender Identities and Intimacy Research in Social Work and Social Care: A Lifecourse Epistemology. Dunk-West, Priscilla and Hafford-Letchfield, Trish, eds. Routledge, London. ISBN 9781138225879 (Accepted/In press)

[img] PDF (Chapter 10 Edited version) - Final accepted version (with author's formatting)
Restricted to Repository staff and depositor only until 6 September 2019.

Download (788kB) |

Abstract

This chapter picks up the study of gender issues within ageing populations. According to OECD statistics, the UK is the loneliest country in Europe and the least likely to report having close friendships or knowing our neighbours (OECD, 2005). The number of people living on their own has doubled since the 1970s, with single-person households now making up a third of all homes. We report on the findings of our examination of some of the factors associated with health and well-being of women living alone in later life using data collected in the ‘Understanding Society’ 2012. This is a nationwide longitudinal survey that captures important information on the life course trajectories of individuals in the UK. By looking at variables associated with health and wellbeing, we have identified some relevant determinants when looking at single older women living alone. The prevalence of living alone during later life varies widely across developed countries, but everywhere its growth has been remarkable in recent decades, even in societies with traditionally strong family ties (Reher and Requena, 2017). Within the increasing trend of single women living alone over time and space, there is a need to adapt and develop more accurate measures and research designs in order to begin to understand the factors impacting on the nature of ageing for those who are living alone. Forming new intimate relationships might be one way of compensating for any loneliness associated with this phenomenon (Carr, 2004).

Item Type: Book Section
Keywords (uncontrolled): Single status; ageing; gender; social work
Research Areas: A. > School of Health and Education > Mental Health, Social Work and Interprofessional Learning
Item ID: 23389
Notes on copyright: This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Sexuality, Sexual and Gender Identities and Intimacy Research in Social Work and Social Care: A Lifecourse Epistemology on 06/03/2018, available online: http://www.routledge.com/9781138225879
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Trish Hafford-Letchfield
Date Deposited: 23 Jan 2018 11:37
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2018 11:37
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/23389

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item

Full text downloads (NB count will be zero if no full text documents are attached to the record)

Downloads per month over the past year