A systematic review and meta-analysis of lifestyle and body mass index predictors of successful assisted reproductive technologies

Purewal, Satvinder, Chapman, Sarah and van den Akker, Olga ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3529-4358 (2019) A systematic review and meta-analysis of lifestyle and body mass index predictors of successful assisted reproductive technologies. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology, 40 (1) . pp. 2-18. ISSN 0167-482X (doi:10.1080/0167482X.2017.1403418)

[img]
Preview
PDF - Final accepted version (with author's formatting)
Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: Lifestyle (smoking, drinking alcohol) and body mass index (BMI) predictors of successful outcomes in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments were examined in this meta-analysis.

Method: A bibliographic search was undertaken using six databases. The review was informed by PRISMA/MOOSE guidelines. Meta analytic data were analysed using random effects models.

Results: We included 77 studies examining effects of BMI, smoking and drinking alcohol. Patients with a BMI<24.9 were significantly more likely to achieve LB/pregnancy than with BMI>25 OR 1.219 (95% CI:1.128–1.319, z 4.971, p<.001; I2 53.779%, p .001). Non-smokers were significantly more likely to achieve a LB or pregnancy than smokers OR 1.457 (95% CI:1.228–1.727, z 4.324, p<.001; I2 51.883; p .001). Meta-regression revealed the number of embryos transferred significantly moderated the effects of smoking on ART outcomes, and there was a trend indicating primary infertility and high BMI were also significant moderators. The evidence for drinking alcohol was inconclusive due to the small number of studies.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis confirms that ART treatment success can be predicted with life-style factors. Further, non-smokers’ relative odds of pregnancy/live birth increase as more embryos were transferred but there was a trend that the odds of pregnancy/live birth decrease with primary infertility and high BMI.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Psychology > Applied Health Psychology group
Item ID: 23078
Notes on copyright: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology on 27/11/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/0167482X.2017.1403418
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Olga Van Den akker
Date Deposited: 05 Dec 2017 10:43
Last Modified: 28 May 2019 18:30
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/23078

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item

Full text downloads (NB count will be zero if no full text documents are attached to the record)

Downloads per month over the past year