(De-)personalization of mediated political communication: comparative analysis of Yugoslavia, Croatia and the UK from 1945 to 2015

Šimunjak, Maja (2017) (De-)personalization of mediated political communication: comparative analysis of Yugoslavia, Croatia and the UK from 1945 to 2015. European Journal of Communication, 32 (5). pp. 473-489. ISSN 0267-3231 (doi:10.1177/0267323117725972)

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Abstract

This article explores the ways in which the personalization of mediated political communication developed since 1945 in an authoritarian, transitional, and established democratic system. Findings from a longitudinal content analysis of Yugoslav (authoritarian) and Croatian (transitional) daily newspapers are compared with those from Langer's (2011) study of personalization in the United Kingdom (established democracy). The comparison of the data related to the personalized media reporting from Yugoslavia and Croatia with that from the UK shows that the trends observed in the transitional context are counter to the existing personalization scholarship and that they run in the opposite direction from trends found in established democracies. Consequently, two new theories are formed that may help explain the personalization trends in transitional societies. These are continuation theory and democratization theory.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Media and Performing Arts > Media
Item ID: 22452
Notes on copyright: Šimunjak, Maja, '(De-)personalization of mediated political communication: comparative analysis of Yugoslavia, Croatia and the UK from 1945 to 2015', European Journal of Communication. Copyright © 2017 SAGE. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Maja Simunjak
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2017 14:14
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 17:44
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/22452

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