Postactivation potentiation and change of direction speed in elite academy rugby players

Bishop, Chris and Turner, Anthony N. and Cree, Jon and Maloney, Sean and Marshall, James and Jarvis, Paul (2017) Postactivation potentiation and change of direction speed in elite academy rugby players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research . ISSN 1064-8011 (Accepted/In press)

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Abstract

This study investigated the effect of preceding pro-agility sprints with maximal isometric squats to determine if postactivation potentiation (PAP) could be harnessed in change of direction speed. Sixteen elite under-17 rugby union players (age: 16 +/- 0.41yrs; body mass: 88.7 +/- 12.1kg, height: 1.83 +/- 0.07m) from an Aviva Premiership rugby club were tested. Subjects performed a change of direction specific warm-up, followed by two baseline pro-agility tests. After 10 minutes recovery, 3 x 3-second maximal isometric squats with a 2 minute recovery between sets were completed as a conditioning activity (CA) on a force plate where peak force and mean rate of force development over 300 milliseconds were measured. The pro-agility test was repeated at set time intervals of 1, 3, 5 and 7 minutes following the CA. Overall pro-agility times were significantly slower (p < 0.05) at 1-minute post-CA compared to the baseline (3.3%), with no significant differences occurring at 3, 5 or 7 minutes post-CA. Therefore, it appears that performing multiple sets of maximal isometric squats do not enhance pro-agility performance.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute
Item ID: 21825
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Jennifer Basford
Date Deposited: 12 May 2017 13:24
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2018 04:49
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/21825

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