The evocation and expression of emotion through documentary animation

Mobbs, Sophie (2016) The evocation and expression of emotion through documentary animation. Animation Practice, Process & Production, 5 (1). pp. 79-99. ISSN 2042-7875 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1386/ap3.5.1.79_1)

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Abstract

How might an animator distil and study emotion? Could animation itself be a means to unlock meaning that previous experiments have not been able to access? Animation has the power to both highlight and conceal emotions as expressed through body movement and gesture. When we view live action (human interview) documentary footage, we are exposed not just to the spoken words, but the subtle nuances of body movements. How much might be lost when documentary footage is transposed into animation, or indeed, what might be gained, translated through the personal and artistic view of the animator?
Drawing on my own previous experience as a games animator, now using research through practice methodology, this paper explores the results of the first of a series of animations created to explore the more subtle nuances of gesture. Though the medium of a documentary style interview, opposing topics are used to evoke strong emotions; firstly of happiness, then of sadness, with a view to accessing real rather than acted (simulated) emotions and their associated body movements.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Art and Design
Item ID: 19893
Notes on copyright: This is the author’s manuscript, the final version of record is published by Intellect in the journal Animation Practice, Process & Production available via: https://doi.org/10.1386/ap3.5.1.79_1
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Depositing User: Sophie Mobbs
Date Deposited: 19 May 2016 13:58
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2019 05:57
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/19893

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