How does working on university-industry collaborative projects affect science and engineering doctorates' careers? Evidence from a UK research-based university

Lee, Hsing-fen and Miozzo, Marcela (2015) How does working on university-industry collaborative projects affect science and engineering doctorates' careers? Evidence from a UK research-based university. The Journal of Technology Transfer, 40 (2). pp. 293-317. ISSN 0892-9912 (doi:10.1007/s10961-014-9340-4)

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Abstract

This paper examines the impact of industrial involvement in doctoral projects on the particular nature of the training and careers of doctorates. We draw on an original survey of job histories of doctorates in physical sciences and engineering from a research-based university in the UK. Using multivariate probit analysis and linearised (robust) and resampling (jackknife) variance estimation techniques, we found that projects with industrial involvement are associated with higher degree of socialisation with industry. There is some evidence showing that these projects are also more likely to focus on solving firm-specific technical problems or developing firm-specific specifications/prototypes, rather than exploring high-risk concepts or generating knowledge in the subject areas. Crucially, these projects result in fewer journal publications. Not surprisingly, in line with existing literature, we found that engaging in projects with industrial involvement (in contrast to projects without industrial involvement) confers advantages on careers in the private sector. Nevertheless, there is also a hint that engaging in projects with industrial involvement may have a negative effect on careers in academia or public research organisations. While acknowledging that the modelling results are based on a small sample from a research-based university and that therefore the results need to be treated with caution, we address implications for doctorates, universities and policymakers.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published online: 17 May 2014
Research Areas: A. > Business School > International Management and Innovation
Item ID: 15983
Notes on copyright: This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in The Journal of Technology Transfer. The final authenticated version is available online at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10961-014-9340-4
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Hsing-Fen Lee
Date Deposited: 14 May 2015 09:39
Last Modified: 30 Jul 2019 02:08
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/15983

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