The effect of caffeine ingestion on coincidence anticipation timing, perceived exertion, and leg pain during submaximal cycling

Duncan, Michael J. and Smith, Mike and Hankey, Joanne and Bryant, Elizabeth (2014) The effect of caffeine ingestion on coincidence anticipation timing, perceived exertion, and leg pain during submaximal cycling. Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 2 (1). pp. 14-27. ISSN 2164-1846

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Abstract

Background: Caffeine ingestion has been purported to beneficially influence cognitive performance during exercise-induced fatigue. Purpose: To examine the impact of caffeine ingestion on coincidence anticipation performance (the ability to judge when a moving stimulus will arrive at a target) during submaximal cycling. Methods: Twenty-five young adults (13 males, 12 females) undertook two 60 min cycling trials at 60% VO2 max, 60 min following ingestion of a caffeine or placebo solution in a randomized order. Anticipation timing was measured prior to ingestion, 55 min post-ingestion (before exercise), and then at 15 min intervals during the cycling bout. Timing accuracy was assessed using error scores. In addition, heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle pain perception were measured. Results: For anticipation timing, absolute error was significantly lower (p = 0.001) in the caffeine condition at post-ingestion (before exercise), and 30, 45, and 60 min during exercise. Variable error was also lower (p = 0.003) in the caffeine condition irrespective of time point. Heart rate was significantly higher (p = 0.032), and RPE (p = 0.0001) and pain perception (p = 0.024) were significantly lower from 30 to 60 min exercise duration with caffeine. Conclusions: This study suggests that caffeine ingestion enhances anticipation timing performance and reduces perceived exertion and leg pain during exercise. These findings may have implications for improving sport performance.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > London Sport Institute > Physiology at the London Sport Institute
Item ID: 15604
Depositing User: Lizi Bryant
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2015 10:26
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2016 14:33
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/15604

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