Revaluation manipulations produce emergence of underselected stimuli following simultaneous discrimination in humans

Reed, P., Reynolds, Gemma and Fermandel, L. (2012) Revaluation manipulations produce emergence of underselected stimuli following simultaneous discrimination in humans. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65 (7). pp. 1345-1360. ISSN 1747-0218

Full text is not in this repository.

Abstract

Stimulus overselectivity occurs when only one of potentially many aspects of the environment controls behaviour. In four experiments, human participants were trained and tested on a trial-and-error simultaneous discrimination task involving two two-element compound stimuli. Overselectivity emerged in all experiments (i.e., one element from the reinforced compound controlled behaviour at the expense of the other). Following revaluation (extinction) of the previously overselected stimulus, behavioural control by the underselected stimulus element emerged without any direct training of that stimulus element. However, while a series of extinction manipulations targeting the revaluation of the overselected stimulus produced differential extinction of that stimulus, they did not result in differential emergence of the previously underselected stimuli. The results are discussed with respect to the theoretical implications for attention-based accounts of overselectivity.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Psychology
Item ID: 15249
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Gemma Reynolds
Date Deposited: 23 Apr 2015 16:52
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2016 14:33
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/15249

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item