The effect of digital signage on shoppers’ behavior: the role of the evoked experience

Dennis, Charles, Brakus, J. Joško, Gupta, Suraksha and Alamanos, Eleftherios (2014) The effect of digital signage on shoppers’ behavior: the role of the evoked experience. Journal of Business Research, 67 (11). pp. 2250-2257. ISSN 0148-2963

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Abstract

This paper investigates the role of digital signage as experience provider in retail spaces. The findings of a survey-based field experiment demonstrate that digital signage content high on sensory cues evokes affective experience and strengthens customers’ experiential processing route. In contrast, digital signage messages high on “features and benefits” information evoke intellectual experience and strengthen customers’ deliberative processing route. The affective experience is more strongly associated with the attitude towards the ad and the approach behavior towards the advertiser than the intellectual experience. The effect of an ad high on sensory cues on shoppers’ approach to the advertiser is stronger for first-time shoppers, and therefore important in generating loyalty. The findings indicate that the design of brand-related informational cues broadcast over digital in-store monitors affects shoppers’ information processing. The cues evoke sensory and affective experiences and trigger deliberative processes that lead to attitude construction and finally elicit approach behavior towards the advertisers.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > Business School > Marketing, Branding and Tourism
Item ID: 14532
Useful Links:
Depositing User: Charles Dennis
Date Deposited: 16 Mar 2015 12:49
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 03:40
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/14532

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