Cultural adaptation of an evidence-based parenting programme with elders from South East Asia in the US: co-producing Families and Schools Together – FAST

McDonald, Lynn, Coover, Gail, Sandler, Jen, Thao, Toua and Shalhoub, Huda (2012) Cultural adaptation of an evidence-based parenting programme with elders from South East Asia in the US: co-producing Families and Schools Together – FAST. Journal of Children’s Services, 7 (2). pp. 113-127. ISSN 1746-6660

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Abstract

Purpose – Without some flexibility, replications of manualised evidence-based programmes (EBP) may not achieve predictable outcomes due to differences in cultural priorities. In this case study, Families and Schools Together (FAST) was co-produced with elders from a community of Hmong political refugees in the US Mid-West. The paper aims to describe and evaluate the process of culturally adapting and implementing this universal parenting programme.

Design/methodology/approach – Observations of FAST groups to monitor programme integrity and notes on adaptation discussions were undertaken. Quantitative evaluations of parents in the first cohort (2 FAST groups) used a wait-list control, randomised strategy, using three standardised instruments completed by the parents three different times. Data from five matched pairs of parent graduates (10) randomly assigned to “FAST now” or “FAST later” were analysed using one-tailed, paired t-tests.

Findings – Hmong parents and elders reported satisfaction on the cultural fit of FAST across the four groups, which graduated on average seven families each. Of 38 low-income families who attended FAST once, 78 percent attended six or more sessions, in other words 22 percent dropped out. Parents reported statistically significant improvements in child anxiety (CBCL internalizing), child social skills (SSRS) and family adaptability (FACES II), with no changes in CBCL externalizing or family cohesion.

Originality/value – The paper provides a detailed study and evaluation of how an EBP can be successfully implemented with a highly socially marginalized group of immigrants in a Western society.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Health and Education > Mental Health, Social Work and Interprofessional Learning
Item ID: 12229
Depositing User: Users 3197 not found.
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2013 15:35
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2017 09:26
URI: https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/12229

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