Sense of humor across cultures: a comparison of British, Australian and American respondents

Martin, G. Neil and Sullivan, Erin (2013) Sense of humor across cultures: a comparison of British, Australian and American respondents. North American Journal of Psychology, 15 (2). pp. 375-384. ISSN 1527-7143

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Abstract

Although humor is considered to be a construct that exists across cultures and nations, there is some evidence that cultures and nations may differ in their self-reported sense of humor and use of humor. However, little research exists. In the current study, we investigated whether differences or similarities existed in British, American and Australian men and women’s sense of humor, measured via the multidimensional Sense of Humor Scale (MSHS). It was found that British respondents’ attitudes toward humorous people were significantly more negative than were those of Australian participants. American participants reported using
humor more frequently in social situations than did British participants.
As predicted, self-reported humor production was greater in men than women, but no interaction with culture was found. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Research Areas: A. > School of Science and Technology > Psychology
Item ID: 10600
Depositing User: Neil Martin
Date Deposited: 08 May 2013 10:34
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 08:36
URI: http://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/id/eprint/10600

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